Why the Limit of 200?

With Gran Fondo Ephrata filling up so fast we are often asked why the limit of 200.  This is a question we’ve had to ask ourselves lately too.  Sure 300 or 400 would be great, more money, more happy customers, win-win right?  Believe it or not this limit is not set by any agency, this is our own limit set by us to maintain the integrity of the event.   What the hell does that mean?  It means 200 is the most we can handle: SAG, aid stations, meals, etc.  (Hint: volunteers are the backbone of events like these.  Want to see them flourish, get involved).  It means these rides are supposed to be epic, rugged, REMOTE rides.  You’re riding through some pretty spectacular terrain, in the middle of nowhere, that’s what this is about, not how many people I can sell an entry to.  It means that these rides are HARD, and intended for experienced cyclists.  We don’t want Mr weekend warrior showing up on his sweet gmc denali road bike because he heard gravel is the new road (although it’s true).  One of two things will happen: he’ll fail miserably, and/or crash and we’ll have to scrape him off the course and haul him back, or worse yet, he’ll insist upon finishing, and we’ll have to babysit him until 9:00 at night when he finally finishes.  Our number one priority is our participants.  If they’re not happy and stoked with what we’re doing then we’ll do something else.  Maybe ping pong.

6 thoughts on “Why the Limit of 200?

  1. 200 keeps it special, add more riders and it starts to become just another mass produced event. You’ve got a good formula going here Jake stick with it!

    Cheers,
    Steve

  2. +1. Glad to see the success, and glad to the focus stay on quality not quantity.

    For those that missed getting in, there were several years with ~50 ish entrants… before gravel was trendy and all.

  3. This is a great decision. Totally behind you on this one. The rides are pretty iconic already and keeping them small maintains that sense of doing something that is worthy of the effort.

    Not against big rides, but they’re so not appropriate for these courses.

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